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50 Knife Experts You Should Follow

50 Knife Experts You Should FollowWhen I first started working my way up in becoming a prominent chef, I had my fair share of failures.

Unfortunately, it caused me to shorten the lifespan of my knives. However, I have the solution for you. Here are 50 knife experts you should follow to avoid making rookie mistakes.

Meeting The Experts

Wicked Edge USA

 “I guess my number one tip would be, no matter how you sharpen, to color in the bevels with a marker and carefully observe how the marker is coming off the bevels as you sharpen.”

Steve Bottorff

 “Initial grinding should be made with the stone going off the edge, creating an “exit” burr.”

RICH’S SHARPENING SERVICE

“Look at your work when done make sure you deburr.”

ONE STOP KNIFE SHOP

“Use a sharpie to color the edge prior to sharpening.”

SHARPENING SERVICE UK

Beginners don’t stress yourself, as what Sharpening Service UK would say. “My tip for beginners would be to keep it simple.”

CLIFF STAMP

The advice is deep, “Start by understanding what sharpening means.”

SHARPER EDGE HAWAII

Sharper Edge agrees on what Cliff Stamp said. “Take your time, learn your basic angles.”

KNIFE DOCTOR

“I never recommend dry grind at all.”

RAZOR EDGE KNIVES

“Make sure you truly apex your edge.”

PHILIP JOHNSON KNIFE SHARPENING

“Take metal off sparingly, it can’t be put back.”

SAMURAI EDGE KNIFE SHARPENING

“Do it slowly, with nice and steady hands.”

INDEFINITELY WILD

“My best advice is to make it easy for yourself by buying knives made from easy to sharpen steels.”

GYUTO KNIFE SHARPENING

“Be diligent to keep your sharpening angle consistent along the whole length of the blade.”

HEIMERDINGER CUTLERY

“My number one tip is to learn to hold a consistent and correct angle.”

KNIFE CENTER

“We recommend one of the kits with guide rods so there is no guess work involved.”

SMITH’S CONSUMER PRODUCTS

“Sharpen regularly.”

PRECISE SHARPENING

“Become expert in using a 1000 grit stone first.”

AMBROSI CUTLERY

“It’s all about the angles!”

SLICE OF LIFE

“Number 1 tip would be buy a good quality knife from a reputable manufacturer.”

DMT

“Number one tip would be- make sure you are sharpening the whole edge and maintaining the same angle all the way through.”

CHROMA CNIFE

“Buy yourself a good stone! Better one knife less, but the best stone!”

KNIFE AND TOOL SHARPENING

“Take your time, be proficient and careful.”

KEVIN NOON SHARPENING

“As a professional knife sharpener, I pay attention to each knife as if I was going to take it home and use it. I make sure it is properly shaped and sharp before returning it to my customers.”

MAKESUSHI

“Practice first on an inexpensive knife several times to find your rhythm.”

JAPANESE KNIFE IMPORTS

“Use sharpie when sharpening. There are probably things one needs to know before even getting this far, but this is by far the thing that makes the biggest difference in beginner sharpeners’ sharpening. Heck, even skilled sharpeners benefit from this.”

ZB SHARPENING

“There is no “one size fits all” system, so starting out, use a system that can keep your edges properly sharp at the angle and style they were designed to be. Do not change the knife profile to fit the system.”

CASEYSPM

“The number one tip is get a burr. Without the burr you will never get the knife sharp.”

THE KNIFE GUY

“Angle guide.”

MAYNARD EDGE

“#1 i suggest getting a guide like this one: make sure the guide matches your factory angle!

#2 also a decent wet stone like this one: a combination stone like the 120/1000 will work fantastic

#3 learn how to use a honing steel correctly (even long time chef’s don’t)”

TOWN CUTLER

“Keeping the angle consistent is key.”

THE KNIFE DOCTOR

“My number one tip? KEEP THE EDGE COOL. A knife is tempered at approx 200 degrees celsius …. not very hot … in fact you can temper knife blades in your oven at home.”

SHARP QUICK

“I have an answer to your question and a piece of advice to those who want to have very sharp knives.”

BRONKS KNIFE WORKS

“The first thing that I usually tell newbie sharpeners is not to try and dig a basement with a tea spoon.”

MCCALL CUTLERY

“Don’t use mineral oil on the sharpening stone because it clogs it.”

A FINER EDGE

“Sharpen until you see a burr the entire length of the edge… no burr… no edge.”

KNIFE HEAVEN

“Start with a cheap knife and keep practicing.”

BÖKER

“For someone who just starts with knife sharpening we would recommend using a sharpener which supports him in holding the right angle.”

KME SHARP

“1) Sharpening is more about knowledge than it is about skill
2) and the most important piece of knowledge is to understand is that Sharpening requires a very coarse stone. Fine and X-fine grit stones can not sharpen a knife. They can only polish and refine the edge created by the coarse stones. Advancing to fine and extra-fine stones before the blade is made sharp by the coarse stone will result in a highly polished … dull blade.”

SHARP EDGES

“Match the angle of sharpening to the knife and its use. For example a meat cleaver would not need to have an edge that would be razor sharp. The edge is designed for heavy use and a chopping motion, the edge if sharpened thin and razor sharp would not last and could be damaged easily.

A fillet knife however would need an edge that is very thin and razor sharp for its intended use.”

EDGE PRO

“For someone who is just getting started with our sharpening system, I’d recommend that you begin practicing on larger kitchen knives.”

R. CASE

“Choose your sharpening device according to where you plan to be when resharpening. You don’t want to be pulling out a benchtop stone while in the uplands hunting geese. And you don’t want to be using a handheld carbide stick-type sharpener at home when you could be using a stone.”

SHARPENERS REPORT

“Read Steve Bottorff book on “Sharpening Made Easy” for non professional knife sharpening. Read Sharpeners Report if you go into business. Youtube is ok, but TRAINING in person is best.”

KORIN

“Make sure your sharpening stone is completely flat when sharpening your knife!”

BLADEHQ

“It is very important to keep your angle right and have patience. Don’t get frustrated and chew the edge off your knife. As far as what product to use for starters, I would suggest the Spyderco Sharpmaker or the Work Sharp. If you’re going to get the Work Sharp, get the Ken Onion edition. It’s a bit more money but it’s so much nicer thus making the extra cash worth it.”

DARREN BUSH

“Maintenance is as important as sharpening. A little work on the front side saves a lot of grinding on the back side.”

DAREX

“Get yourself a Work Sharp Knife & Tool Sharpener and sharpen like a pro – literally.”

STEFAN STEIGERWALD

“For finest surfaces and nice geometry I take the “wicked edge”. For everything else a “Dianova” sharpener.”

WHITMAN SHARPENING

“Tip to professional knife sharpeners: Research your equipment you expect to purchase very well. Determine your field of potential expertise as there are many directions you can pursue in the sharpening endeavours. Return on investment and satisfaction of career choice are very important.”

SPYDERCO

“The best tip we could give someone who is just learning to sharpen a knife, is to maintain a consistent angle—no matter what sharpener you use. Obviously, the beauty of our Sharpmaker is that it does this for you and greatly reduces the skill necessary to sharpen a knife.”

SHARPENING SUPPLIES

“We work with beginning sharpeners on a daily basis. The most common mistake beginners tend to make is skipping the coarse grits and going straight to fine grits.

Fine grits sharpen many times slower than coarser girts. It is important to start with a fast sharpening coarse stone so they can see their results more quickly, and then refine the edge with finer grits. We have found that beginners focus on the end result and overestimate the speed that a very fine stone can sharpen. The fine stones sharpen slowly and therefore give slower feedback. The inexperienced sharpener may mistake the lack of progress for a lack in technique. Coarse stones will make quick work of sharpening by dramatically cutting down on the number of strokes needed and reduce the overall sharpening time.

While beginners can make a number of mistakes, starting with too fine of a stone is easy to fix. Simply use a coarse stone with a grit between 200 and 400 before you move to finer grits. The finer grits should be used to refine an edge after it is coarsely sharpened.”

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